Thursday, June 11, 2009

Claiborne County, TN Early Records

Submitted by Tracy Hutchison
Transcribed by Cindy Young

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Commissioner of Claims
Act March 3D, 1871
No. 20035 51556
Claim of
Wilson Goin
Of
Claiborne County
State of Tenn.
Summary Report
Amount Allowed $145.
Submitted to Congress
December 13, 1878


No. 20035
The Claim of Wilson Goin
Nature of Claim Amount Claimed Amount Allowed
Dollars-Cents Dollars-Cents

One Mare 125. 125.
20 Bush Corn 20. 20.
____ ____

Total 145. 145.

REMARKS
Claimant ____? so loyal sentiments and that he voted against “separation” and adhered to the Union. He was threatened and at one time in 1863 moved to Kentucky to avoid the Rebels, and remained until the Union troops occupied Claiborne County. He had two sons and one son-in-law in the Union army. He filed this claim before the Br___? Farm. The supplies were taken by Gen. Wilcox’s command in 1863, as his witnesses testify. He got receipts at the time and sent them to Cumberland Gap for collection. He was then directed to send them to Knoxville, which he did and they were left with an officer there for settlement but he never paid over the money nor returned the receipts. We allow the sum of $145.----------A.O. Aldes?, S.B. Harrell?, O. Ferriss, Comm. Of Claims.

No. 20035 February, 1873
Petition of Wilson Goin
TO THE COMMISSIONER OF CLAIMS
Resident of Tazewell,
Claiborne County, Tenn.
Nature of Claim (blank)
Amount Claimed $145.00
Filed by B. McKinney
Tazewell, Tenn.

To The Honorable Commissioners of Claims,
Under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1871, Washington, D.C.:
The petition of (1) Wilson Goin
respectfully represents:
That he is a citizen of the United States, and reside at present at or near
(2) Tazewell, Claiborne County, Tenn.
And that he resided when this claim accrued at or near (3) Tazewell,
Claiborne County, Tenn.
That he has a claim against the United States for property (4) taken
For the use of the army of the United States during the late rebellion at (or near)
Tazewell, in the County of Claiborne, in the state of Tennessee.
That the said claim, stated by items, and excluding any and all items of damage, destruction and loss, (and not use) or property; of unauthorized or unnecessary depredations by troops and other persons upon property, or of rent or compensation for the use or occupation of building grounds, or other real estate, as follows:
Date Quantities and Articles Value
1863, Nov. 30
1 Bay Mare 7 years old, 15-1/2 hds high @ $125.00
20 bu of corn @ 10. per bu 20.00
----------
Total $145.00


That the property in question was taken or furnished for the use of a portion of the army of the United States, known as (5) left ring army of the Ohio and commanded by Genl or B. Wilcox and that the persons who took or received the property, or who authorized or directed it be taken or furnished, were the following:
Name Rank
Lt Carter Lt
That the property was removed to (6) (blank) and used for or by (7) said command. All this on or about the (blank) day of (blank) in the year of 186 (blank) That (8) no voucher, receipt, or other writing, was given for the property which was lost while before the Commissioner at Knoxville. That your petitioner verily believes that the property described was (9) (blank) under the following circumstances, or one or more of such circumstances, viz:
1. For the actual use of the army, and not for the mere gratification of individual officers or soldiers already provided by the Government with such articles as were necessary or proper for them to have.
2. In consequence of the failure of the troops of the United States to receive from the Government in the customary manner, or to have in their possession at the time, the articles and supplies necessary for them, for which they were entitled to receive and have.
3. In consequence of some necessity for the articles taken, or similar articles; which necessity justified the officers or soldiers taking them?
4. For some purpose so necessary, useful, beneficial, or justifiable as to warrant or require the Government to pay for it.
5. Under the order or authority of some officer, or other person connected with the army, whose rank, situation, duties, or other circumstances at the time authorized, empowered, or justified him in taking or receiving it, or ordering it to be taken or received.
That (10) Wilson Goin of Tazewell, Tenn, the original owner of said claim, and that Wilson Goin of Tazewell, Tenn. is the present owner of the same (11) no other person having any interest therein. That your petitioner remained loyally adherent to the cause and the Government of the United States during the war, and was so loyal before and at the time of the taking of the property for which this claim is made, and he solemnly declare that, from the beginning of hostilities against the United States to the end thereof his sympathies were constantly with the cause of the United States; that he never, of his own free will or accord, did anything or offered, or sought, or attempted to do anything, by word or deed, to injure said cause or retard its success, and that he was at all times ready and willing, when called upon, or if called upon, to aid and assist the cause of the Union, or its supporters, so far as his means and power, and the circumstances of the cause permitted.
Note
5. Describe the organization as fully and particularly as possible.
6. State as well as can be done the place to which the property was conveyed.
7. State as fully and minutely as possible, the particular persons or commands using the property, and to what particular uses it was applied or intended to be applied.
8. If any vouchers or written papers were given, attach the originals or copies, or state where the originals are to be found and give the substance of them.
9. Taken of “furnished.”
10. The loyalty of the owner of the property when taken or furnished, and of all persons having a present beneficial interest in the claim, must be established by proof.
11. If any other persons than the original owner now own or have an interest in the claim, state how such ownership or interest was acquired.
The said claim has not before been presented to (12) any Dept of the Govt for s____?
That B? McKinney of Tazewell, Tenn. hereby authorized and empowered to act as Attorney’s for the prosecution of this claim. Wherefore your petitioner pray for such action of your Honorable Commission in the premises as may be deemed just and proper.
Signed: (13) X Wilson Goin
Witness
State of Tennessee
County of Claiborne
(14) Wilson Goin being duly sworn (15) deposes and says that he is the petitioner named in the foregoing petition, and who signed the same; that the matters therein stated are true, of the deponent’s own knowledge, except as to those matters which are stated on information and belief, and as to those matters he believes them to be true; and deponent further says that he did not voluntarily serve in the Confederate army or navy, either as an officer, soldier, or sailor, or in any other capacity, at any time during the late rebellion; that he never voluntarily furnished any stores, supplies, or other material aid to said Confederate army or navy, or to the Confederate government, or to any officer, department or adherent of the same in support thereof, and that he never voluntarily accepted or exercised the functions of any office whatsoever under, or yielded voluntary support to, the said Confederate Government.
Signed X Wilson Goin
Witness
Sworn and subscribed in my presence, the 18th day of Feby 1873, Eli Goin (Clerk)
Names and residences of witnesses who will be relied upon to prove loyalty:
Eli Goin, Tazewell, Tenn.
A.J. Duncan, Tazewell, Tenn.
Names and residences of witnesses who will be relied upon to prove the other facts alleged in the foregoing petition:
A.J. Duncan, Tazewell, Tenn.
Thos. Goin, Tazewell, Tenn.
Post Office of Claimant: Tazewell, Tenn.
Post Office of Attorney: Tazewell, Tenn.
Note 12. If the claim has heretofore been presented to any branch of the Government, state when and where presented, and what action was taken upon it.
13. Claimants sign here.
14. Give the names of all the petitioners.
15. If more than one petitioner, insert the words, “each for himself”, and in the next line insert, “one of” in the proper blanks.

No. 20035
Claim of
Wilson Goin
Of
Tazewell, Claiborne County, Tennessee
$145.00
Application
To Have Testimony Taken
By
Special Commissioner
E.A. Shipley
Filed By
B. McKinney
Att
Tazewell, Tenn.

Directions

Note 1. Insert number of, the claim, if known.
2. ‘Taken” or “furnished.”
3. Describe the military organization by name as fully and particularly as possible.
4. State as well as can be done, the place to which the property was conveyed for the use of the army.
5. State as fully and minutely as possible, the particular persons or commands using the property, and to what particular use it was applied.
6. The claimant’s name should be signed here, either by himself of his attorney.

No. 20035 (1)
Before Commissioners of Claims, Under Act of Congress of March 3, 1871
In the matter of the claim of Wilson Goin of Tazewell, in the County of Claiborne, and State of Tennessee.
Comes now the claimant before E.A. Shipley, Esq., Special Commissioner for the State of Tennessee, and represents that he has heretofore filed with the above named Commissioners a Petition for the allowance of a claim for property (2) taken, for the use of the army of the United States, which claim, as stated below, does not exceed the sum of five thousand dollars. That the said claim, stated by items, and excluding therefrom all such items as refer to the DAMAGE, DESTRUCTION, and LOSS, and not the USE, of property; to unauthorized, or unnecessary DEPREDATIONS of troops and other persons, upon the property, or to RENT or compensation for the occupation of buildings, grounds, or other real estate, as follows:
No. of Item Quantities and Articles Value
Dollars Cts
1. 1 Bay Mare 7 years old 15-1/2 hds 125.00
2. 20 Bushels of Corn @ 1.00 20.00
---------
TOTAL $145.00

That as stated in the Petition referred to, the property in question was taken from Wilson Goin, of Tazewell, in the state of Tennessee, for the use of a portion of the Army of the United States, known as (3) Leftwing army of the Ohio and commanded byM__? Gen’l, O.B. Wilcox and that the person’s who took or received the property, or who authorized or directed it to be taken or furnished, were the following:
Name Rank Regiment, Corps, or Station
Carter Lent 116 “Ind” Vol
That the property was removed to (4) Cumberland Gap, Tenn. (5) said command; all this on or about the 15 day of November, in the year 1863, as appears by the petition presented to the Commissioners. That, by the following named persons, the claimant expects to prove that, from the beginning of hostilities against the United States to the end thereof, his sympathies were constantly with the cause of the United States, that he never, of his own free will and accord, did anything, or offered, or sought, or attempted to do anything, by word or deed, to injure said cause or retard its successes, and that he was at all times ready and willing, when called upon, or if called upon, to aid and assist the cause of the Union, or its supporters, so far as his means and power and the circumstances of the case permitted:
Eli Goin, of Tazewell, Tennessee
A.J. Duncan, of Tazewell, Tennessee
G.W. Freece?, of Tazewell, Tennessee
That, by the following named persons, the Claimant expects to prove the taking or furnishing of the property for the use of the army of the United States:
A.J. Duncan, of Tazewell, Tennessee
Thomas Goin, of Tazewell, Tennessee
Colbert Day, of Tazewell, Tennessee
Sterling Goin, of Tazewell, Tennessee
The claimant now prays that the testimony of the witnesses just designated to be taken and recorded, at such place and at such time as the Special Commissioner may designate at the proper cost of the said Claimant; and that due notice of the time and place of the taking thereof be given to the Claimant, through his council.
Submitted on this 19th day of Sept. 1877.
(6) Wilson Goin – Claimant
by B. McKinney – Attorney
P.O. Address of Attorney: Tazewell, Tennessee

Directions: This certificate, with accompanying printed questions, goes in front of the depositions. A single sheet, marked “Last Page,” accompanies this double sheet, and goes at the end of the depositions, having on its outside a printed form of endorsement to be filled up by the special Commissioner.
Act March 3, 1871.
Before the Commissioners of Claims.
Claim of Wilson Goin, the County of Claiborne, and State of Tennessee, numbered 20035.
It is hereby certified that on the 21st day Sept, 1877 at Tazewell in the County of Claiborne and State of Tennessee came personally before me, for the purpose of a hearing in the above-entitled cause, the following persons, namely:
Wilson Goin, Claimant
B. McKinney, Counsel
Witnesses: Colbert Day, William Killian, George W. Freece, Andrew J. Duncan, Sterling Goin
Each and every deponent, previous to his or her examination, was properly and duly sworn, or affirmed to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth concerning the matters under examination; the claimant’s witnesses were examined separately and apart from each other; the testimony of each deponent was written out by me in presence of such deponent, who signed the same in my presence after having the deposition read aloud to each deponent, and the signature of such deponent was by me attested at the time it was affixed to the deposition.
Witness my hand and seal this 24th day of Sept, 1877.
E.A. Shipley
Special Commissioner

STANDING INTERROGATORIES
The following questions will be put to every person who gives testimony.

1. What is your name, your age, your residence and how long has it been such, and your occupation?
2. If you are not the claimant, it what manner, if any, are you related to the claimant or interested in the success of the claim?
3. Where were you born? If not born in the United States, when and where were you naturalized? Produce your naturalization papers if you can.
4. Where were you residing and what was your business for six months before the outbreak of the rebellion, and where did you reside and what was your business from the beginning to the end of the war? And if you changed your residence or business, state how many times, and why such changes were made.
5. On which side were your sympathies during the war, and were they on the same side from beginning to end?
6. Did you ever do anything or say anything against the Union cause: and if so, what did you say, and why?
7. Were you at all times during the war willing and ready to do whatever you could in aid of the Union cause?
8. Did you ever do anything for the Union cause, or its advocates or defenders? If so, state what you did, giving times, places, names of persons aided, and particulars. Were the person aided your relatives?
9. Had you any near relatives in the Union army or navy? If so, in what company and regiment, or on what vessel, when and where did each one enter service, and when and how did he leave service? If he was a son, produce his discharge paper, in order that its contents may be noted in this deposition, or state why it cannot be produced.
10. Were you in the service or employment of the United States Government at any time during the war? If so, in what service, when, where, for how long, under what officers, and when and how long did you leave such service of employment?
11. Did you ever voluntarily contribute money, property, or services to the Union cause; and if so, when, where, to whom, and what did you contribute?
12. Which side did you take while the insurgent States were seceding from the Union in 1860 and 1861, and what did you do to show on which side you stood?
13. Did you adhere to the Union cause after the States has passed into rebellion, or did you go with your state?
14. What were your feelings covering the battle of Bull Run or Manassas, the capture of New Orleans, the fall of Vicksburg, and the final surrender of the Confederate forces?
15. What favors, privileges, or protections were ever granted you in recognition of your loyalty during the war, and when and by whom granted?
16. Have you ever taken the so-called “iron-clad oath” since the war, and when on what occasions?
17. Who were the leading and best known Unionists of your vicinity during the war? Are any of them called to testify to your loyalty; and if not, why not?
18. Were you ever threatened with damage or injury to your person, family, or property on account of your Union sentiments, or were you actually molested or injured on account of your Union sentiments? If so, when, where, by whom, and in what particular way were you injured or threatened with injury?
19. Were you ever arrested by and Confederate officer, soldier, sailor, or other person professing to act for the Confederate government, or for any State in rebellion? If so, when, where, by whom, for what cause: how long were you kept under arrest: how did you obtain your release: did you take any oath or give any bond to effect your release: and if so, what was the nature of the oath or the bond?
20. Was any of your property taken by Confederate officers or soldiers, or any rebel authority: If so, what property, when, where, by whom, were you ever paid therefore, and did you ever present an account therefore to the Confederate government, or any rebel officer?
21. Was any of your property ever confiscated by rebel authority, on the ground that you were an enemy to the rebel cause? If so, give all the particulars and state if the property was subsequently released or compensation made therefore.
22. Did you ever do anything for the Confederate cause, or provide any aid or comfort to the rebellion? If so, give the times, places, persons, and other particulars connected with each transaction.
23. What force, compulsion, or influence was used to make you do anything against the Union cause? If any, give all the particulars demanded in the last question.
24. Were you in ay service, business, or employment, for the Confederacy, or for any rebel authority? If so, give the same particulars as before required.
25. Were you in the civil, military, or naval service of the Confederacy, or any rebel State, in any capacity whatsoever: If so, state fully in respect to each occasion and service.
26. Did you ever take any oath to the so-called Confederate States while in any rebel service or employment?
27. Did you ever have charge of any stores, or other property, for the Confederacy; or did you ever sell or furnish any supplies to the so-called Confederate States in rebellion; or did you have any share or interest in contracts or manufacturers in aid of the rebellion?
28. Were you engaged in blockade running, or running through the lines, or interested in the risks or profits of ventures?
29. Were you in any way interested in any vessel navigating the waters of the Confederacy, or entering or leaving any Confederate port? If so, what vessel, when and where employed, in what business, and had any rebel authority any direct or indirect interest in vessel or cargo?
30. Did you ever subscribe to any loan of the Confederate States, or of any rebel State: or own Confederate bonds or securities, or the bonds or securities of any rebel State issued between 1861 and 1865? Did you sell, or agree to sell, cotton or produce to the Confederate Government, or to any rebel State, or to any rebel officer or agent, and if so, did you receive or agree to receive Confederate or State bonds or securities in payment: and if so, to what amount, and for what kind and amount of property?
31. Did you contribute to the raising, equipment or support of troops, or the building of gunboats, in aid of the rebellion: or to military hospitals or invalids, or to relief funds or subscriptions for the families of persons serving against the United States?
32. Did you ever give any information to any person in aid of military or naval operations against the United States?
33. Were you at any time a member of any society or organization for equipping volunteers or conscripts, or for aiding the rebellion cause in any way?
34. Did you ever take on oath of allegiance to the so-called Confederate States? If so, state how often, when, where, for what purpose, and the nature of the oath or affirmation.
35. Did you ever receive a pass from rebel authority? If so, state when, where, for what purpose, on what conditions, and how the pass was used.
36. Had you any near relatives in the Confederate army, or in any military or naval services hostile to the United States? If so, give names, ages on entering service, present residence, if living, what influence you exerted, if any, against their entering the service, and in what way you contributed to their outfit or support.
37. Have you ever been under the disabilities imposed by the fourteenth amendment to the Constitution? Have your disabilities been removed by Congress?
38. Have you been specially pardoned by the President for participation in the rebellion?
39. Did you take any amnesty oath during the war, or after its close? If so, when, where, and why did you take it?
40. Were you ever a prisoner of the United States authorities, or on parole, or under bonds to do nothing against the Union cause? If so, state all the particulars.
41. Were you ever arrested by the authorities of the United States during the war? If so, when, where, by whom, on what grounds, and when and how did you obtain your release?
42. Were any fines or assessments levied upon you by the authorities of the United States because of your supposed sympathy for the rebellion? If so, state all the facts.
43. Was any of your property taken into possession or sold by the United States under the laws relating to confiscation, or to captured and abandoned property?

The following questions will be put to all male claimants or beneficiaries who were not less than sixteen years of age when the war closed:

44. After the Presidential election of 1860, if of age, did you vote for any candidates, or on any questions, during the war and how did you vote? Did you vote for or against candidates favoring secession? Did you vote for or against the ratification of the ordinances of secession, or for or against separation in your state?
45. Did you belong to any vigilance committee, or committee of safety, homeguard, or any other form of organization or combination designed to suppress Union sentiment in your vicinity?
46. Were you in the Confederate army, State militia, or any military or naval organization hostile to the United States? If so, state when, where, in what organization, how and why you entered, how long you remained each time, and when and how you left. If you claim that you were conscripted, when and where was it, how did you receive notice, and from whom, and what was the precise manner in which the conscription was enforced against you. If you were never in the rebel army or other hostile organization, explain how you escaped service. If you furnished a substitute, when and why did you furnish one, and what is his name, and his present address, if living?
47. Were you in any way connected with or employed in the Confederate quartermaster, commissary, ordnance, engineer, or medical department, or any other department, or employed on any railroad transporting troops or supplies for the Confederacy or otherwise engaged in transportation of men and supplies for the Confederacy: If so, state how employed, when, where, for how long, under whose direction, and why such employment was not giving “aid and comfort” to the rebellion.
48. Did you at any time have charge of trains, teams, wagons, vessels, boats, or military supplies or property of any kind for the Confederate government? If so, give all the facts as in previous questions.
49. Were you employed in saltpeter works, in tanning or milling for the Confederate government, or making clothing, boots, shoes, saddles, harness, arms, ammunition, accoutrements, or any other kind of munitions of war for the Confederacy? If so, give all the particulars of time, place, and nature of service or supplies.
50. Were you ever engaged in holding in custody, directly or indirectly, any person taken by the rebel government as prisoners of war, or any persons imprisoned or confined by the confederate government, or the authorities of any rebel State, for political causes? If so, when, where, under what circumstances, in what capacity were you engaged, and what was the name and rank of your principal?
51. Were you ever in the Union army or navy, or in any service connected therewith? If so, when, where, in what capacity, under whose command or authority, for what period of time, and when and how did you leave service? Produce your discharge papers, so that their contents may be noted herein.

The following questions will be put to every person testifying to the loyalty of claimants or beneficiaries:

52. In whose favor are you here to testify?
53. How long have you known that person altogether, and what part of that time have you intimately known him?
54. Did you live near him during the war, and how far away?
55. Did you meet him often, and about how often, during the war?
56. Did you converse with the claimant about the war, its causes, its progress, and its results? If so, try to remember the more important occasions on which you so conversed, beginning with the first occasion, and state, with respect to each, when it was, where it was, who were present, what caused the conversation, and what the claimant said in substance, if you cannot remember the words.
57. Do you know anything done by this claimant that showed him to be loyal to the Union during the cause during the war? If you do, state what he did, when, where, and what was the particular cause or occasion of his doing it? Give the same information about each thing he did that showed him to be loyal.
58. Do you know of anything said or done by the claimant that was against the Union cause? If so, please state with respect to each thing said or done, what it was, when it was, where it was, and what particular compulsion or influence caused him to say or do it.
59. If you have heard of anything said or done by the claimant, either for the Union cause or against it, state from whom you heard it, when you heard it, and what you heard.
60. What was the public reputation of the claimant for loyalty or disloyalty to the United States during the war? If you profess to know his public reputation, explain fully how you know it, whom you heard speak of it, and give the names of other persons who were neighbors during the war that could testify to his public reputation.
61. Who were the known and prominent Union people of the neighborhood during the war, and do you know that such persons could testify to the claimant’s loyalty?
62. Were you, yourself, and adherent of the Union cause during the war? If so, did the claimant know you to be such, and how did he know it?
63. Do you know of any threats, molestations, or injury inflicted upon the claimant, or his family, or his property, on account of his adherence to the Union cause? If so, give the particulars.
64. Do you know of any act done or language used by the claimant that would have prevented him from establishing his loyalty to the Confederacy? If so, what act, or what language.
65. Can you state any other facts within your own knowledge in proof of the claimant’s loyalty during the war? If so, state all the facts add give the particulars.

The following questions concerning the ownership of property charged in claims will be put to all claimants, or the representatives of deceased claimants:

66. Who was the owner of the property charged in this claim when it was taken, and how did such person become owner?
67. If any of the property was taken from a farm or plantation, where was such farm or plantation situated, what was its size, how much was cultivated, how much was woodland, and how much was waste land?
68. Has the person who owned the property when taken since filed a petition in bankruptcy, or been declared a bankrupt?

The following questions will be put to female claimants:

69. Are you married or single? If married, when were you married? Was your husband loyal to the cause and Government of the United States throughout the war? Where does he now reside, and why is he not joined with you in the petition? How many children have you? Give their names and ages. Were any of them in the Confederate service during the war? If you claim that the property named in your petition is your sole and separate property state how you came to own it separately from your husband: how your title was derived: when your ownership of it began. Did it ever belong to your husband? If the property for which you ask pay is wool, timber, rails, or the products of a farm, how did you get title to the farm? If by deed, can you file copies of the deed? If single, have you been married? If a widow, when did your husband die? Was he in the Confederate army? Was he in the civil service of the confederacy? Was he loyal to the United States Government throughout the war? Did he leave any children? How many? Are any now living? Give their names and ages. Are they not interested in this claim? If they are not joined in this petition, why not? State fully how your title to the property specified in the petition was obtained. Did you ever belong to any sewing society organized to make clothing for Confederate soldiers or their families, or did you assist in making any such clothing, or making flags or other military equipments, or preparing or furnishing delicacies or supplies for Confederate hospitals or soldiers?

The following questions will be put to colored claimants:

70. Were you a slave or free at the beginning of the war? If ever a slave, when did you become free? What business did you follow after obtaining your freedom? Did you own this property before or after you became free? When did you get it? How did you become the owner, and from whom did you obtain it? Where did you get the means to pay for it? What was the name and residence of your master, and is he still living? Is he a witness for you, and if not, why not? Are you in his employ now, or do you live on his land bought from him? Are you in his debt? What other person besides yourself has any interest in this claim?

The following questions will be put to all colored witnesses in behalf of white claimants:

71.Were you formerly the slave of the claimant? Are you now in his service or employment? Do you live on his land? Are you in his debt? Are you in any way to share in this claim if allowed?

The following questions will be put to claimants and witnesses who testify to the taking of property, omitting in the case of each claimant or witness any questions that are clearly unnecessary:

72. Were you present when any of the property charged in this claim was taken? Did you actually see if taken? If. so, specify what you saw taken.
73. Was any of the property taken in the night time, or was any taken secretly, so that you did not know of it at the time?
74. Was any complaint made to any officer of the taking of any of the property? If so, give the name, rank, and regiment of the officer, and state who made the complaint to him, what he said and did in consequence, and what was the result of the complaint?
75. Were any vouchers or receipts asked for or given? If given, where are the vouchers or receipts? If lost, state fully how lost. If asked and not given, by whom were they asked, who was asked to give them, and why were they refused or not given? State very fully in regard to the failure to ask or obtain receipts.
76. Has any payment ever been made for any property charged in this claim? Has any payment been made for any property taken at the same times as the property charged in this claim? Has any payment been made for any property taken from the same claimant during the war, and if so, when, by whom, for what property and to what amount? Has this property, or any part of it, been included in any claim heretofore presented to Congress, or any court, department or officer of the United States, or to any board of survey, military commission, State commission or officer, or any other authority? If so, when and to what tribunal or officers was the claim presented; was it larger or smaller in amount than this claim and how is the difference explained, and what was the decision, if any, of the tribunal to which it was presented.
77. Was the property charged in this claim taken by troops encamped in the vicinity, or were they on the march, or were they on a raid or expedition, or had there been any resent battle or skirmish?
78. You will please listen attentively while the list of items, but not quantities is read to you, and as each kind of property is called off, say whether you saw any such property taken.
79. Begin now with the first item of property you have just said you saw taken, and give the following information about it. 1st. Describe its exact condition, as, for instance, if corn, whether green or ripe, standing or harvested, in shuck, or husked, or shelled; if lumber, whether new or old, in buildings or piled; if grain, whether growing or cut, &e., &e. 2d. State where it was. 3d. what was the quantity; explain fully how you know the quantity, and if estimated, describe your method of making the estimate. 4th. Describe the quality to your best judgment. 5th. State as nearly as you can the market value of such property at the time in United States money. 6th. Say when the property was taken. 7th. Give the name of the detachment, regiment, brigade, division, corps, or army, taking the property, and the names of any officers belonging to the command. 8th. Describe the precise manner in which the property was taken into possession by the troops, and the manner in which it was removed. 9th. State as closely as you can how many men, animals, wagons, or other means of transport, were engaged in the removal, how long they were occupied, and to what place they removed the property. 10th. State if any officers were present; how you knew them to be officers; what they said or did in relation to the property, and give the names of any, if you can. 11th. Give any reasons that you may have for believing that the taking of the property was authorized by the proper officers or that it was for the necessary use of the army.
80. Now take the next item of the property you saw taken and give the same information, and so proceed to the end of the list of items.

Page 1
Testimony of Wilson Goin the claimant taken by me at Tazewell, Tenn. on this 21st day of Sept, 1877. Claim No. 20035
Quest No. 1 & 2. My name is Wilson Goin, my age about 65 years, my residence is 8 miles west of Tazewell, Tenn., Claiborne County and have resided there about one year when my property was taken which is charged in my claim. I resided on Powell’s River about 9 miles west of Tazewell, Tenn. My occupation is that of a farmer. I am the claimant.
Quest No. 3. I was born in Montgomery Co., North Carolina.\
Quest No. 4. I resided on Powell’s river, Claiborne Co., Tenn. 6 months prior to the outbreak of the war, and was a farmer by occupation, and such was my residence and occupation during the entire war, except about 2 months in the fall of 1863, when I left home with my family and went to the federal lives in Kentucky to avoid the rebels and I returned to my home in Claiborne, Tenn. as soon as Genl Burnside’s forces occupied East Tenn., this was the only time that I changed my residence during the war. I was in no particular business or employment while I was in Kentucky.
Quest 5, 6, 7, & 8. My sympathies were on the side of the Union from the beginning to the end of the war. I never did or said anything against the Union cause. I was at all times during the war ready and willing to do what I could in aid of the Union cause. While I lived on Powell’s River I had a canoe and frequently ferried parties over the river who were going in secret to the Union lives in Kentucky. I have set there across the river day & night, one of the parties whom I set across the river named Jerald D. Mayes, afterward culested? into the federal army, Co. C., 1st Tenn., Lt. Arly, also a son of his whose name I have now forgotten went into the same Co. and Regt.
Quest 9. I had two sons, John B. and A. Jackson Goin were soldiers in Co. C, 1st Tenn, Lt. Arty, U.S. service-a copy of whose discharges from said service is hereby exhibited from the Registers book of Claiborne Co., Tenn. formerly authenticated in Book “A”,, No. 2, pages 90 and 106. John B. Goin was enrolled on the 12th day of May 1863 and honorably discharged the 1st day of August 1865. Andrew J. Goin was enrolled on the 10th of Sept. 1863, and honorably discharged on the 1st of August 1865-both soldiers were born in Claiborne Co, Tenn.- I also had a son-in-law named Jasper Keck who was s soldier in the same Co. & Regt with my sons.
Quest 10 & 11. I was never in the service of the United States during the war. I never contributed any money or property to aid the Union cause my poverty prevented me from doing so.
Quest 12 & 13. While the insurgents states were seceding from the Union in 1860 & 1861 I took the side of the Union and always talked and voted for the Union, and I adhered to the Union cause after my state had passed into rebellion.
Quest 14. I have no recollection of having heard anything concerning the Battle of Bull Run. I enjoyed when I heard of the federal victory at Vicksburg and the final surrender of the Confederate forces.
Quest 15 & 16. I received no special favors from the Government on account of any loyalty during the war. I never took the so-called Iron Clad Oath.
Quest 17. Ranson Cupp?, John W. Buford, William Hodges, Eli Goin, A.J. Duncan & others were prominent Union men in my vicinity during the war—I expect to prove my loyalty by some of the parties above named.
Quest 18. A party of rebel soldiers who were strangers to me came to my house during the war and threatened to shoot me and actually drew their guns on me and compelled me to give up a rifle gun which I had. I cannot now recollect at what time this occurred but think it was before I went to Kentucky in 1863, they said a great deal to me but I was so badly scared that I could not recollect all that was said. I was afraid that they were going to kill me and they finally went off and left me.
Quest 19. I was never was arrested by any Confederate officers or persons acting for the Confederacy.
Quest 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, & 31. To each and every question in detail from 20 to 31 inclusive, the claimant answered in the negative.
Quest 32 & 33. I never gave any information to any persons of military or naval operations against the Union states. I never was a member of any society or organization for equipping volunteers or conscripts-or for aiding the rebellion in any manner whatsoever.
Quest 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, & 39. I never took any oath of allegiance to the so-called Confederate States, I never received a pass from rebel authority. I had to near relatives in the Confederate army. I have never been under the disabilities act based on the 14th amendment to the constitution. I have never been specially pardoned by the President. I never taken any amnesty oath-at any time
Quest 40, 41, 42, & 43. I never was a prisoner of the United States authority or on parole, or under bond to do nothing against the Union cause. No fines or assessments were ever levied upon any of my property by the United States authorities, none of my property was ever taken into possession or sold by the United States under an law.
Quest 44. I only state that I now recollect from the beginning to the close of the war, was against separation.
Quest 45 & 46. I never belonged to any vigilance committee or I then any form of organizations designed to suppress Union sentiment in my vicinity. I never was in the Confederate army, navy, or militia, or any organization hostile to the United States. I never was conscripted nor did I furnish any substitute. I was too old to be conscripted—and I always kept myself out of the way of rebels when I was able to do so.
To each and every question from 47 to 54 inclusive claimant, answered in detail in the negative.
Quest 66 & 67. I was the owner of the property charged in this claim when it was taken. I raised the corn. I purchased the mare from William Killian. There was about 100 acres of the land, 25 of which was under cultivation, the balance in woodland.
Quest 68. I have never filed a petition in bankruptcy nor have I ever been declared bankrupt.
Quest 72. I was present when the property charged in this claim was taken. I did not see anything but 10 bushels of corn taken, this corn I shucked and measured for __? in the field, the person who got the 10 bushels of corn gave me a receipt for it. I do not know whether he was an officer or not, the corn was hauled in a wagon and the soldiers said they were going to haul it to a picket post two miles from Tazewell on the Cumberland Gap road, they were Federal soldiers. I do not know their co__? and if they told me I have now forgotten it—This corn was taken about the 1st of Nov. 1863 as near as I can now recollect, it was taken by Genl Wilcox’s “6 month’s over” the rest of the corn charged supposed to be 10 bushels was taken from my stable shortly after the corn was furnished to the Pickets as I have stated above it was of the same crop. I did not see the last corn taken but I saw the soldiers hauling if off in a wagon, and before the wagon had left my farm. The mare was a bay, about 7 years old, she was about 15 hands high, she was taken by a Lieut from my pasture field, I did not see her taken, she was taken at night, and the corn from my stable (10 bushels) was taken the following morning. The Lieut who was with the party who got the corn from the stable gave me a receipt for the corn and also gave me a receipt for the mare which had here taken the night before for his company. My best recollection is that the Lieut name was Carter and that he belonged to Genl Wilcox’s command—the receipt for the mare and the receipt for the corn were separate—I got the receipts from Lieut Carter a few hours after the corn was taken from the stable. Lieut Carter belonged to the Federal army, he admitted he got the corn and the mare and did not object to give the receipts. I handed these receipts to wit: the one for 10 bushels of corn, measured from the field, the one for 10 bushels (I think) taken from my stable and the receipt for the mare to Colbert Day, where he was about to start to Cumberland Gap to collect the money for me, he could not collect the money on the
receipts and returned them to me, I afterward handed them to Sterling Goin, a neighbor of mine to take them to Knoxville to collect the money for them, he informed me he had taken them to Knoxville and left them with someone, and that he was to go back at a certain time and get the money, he went back to Knoxville but failed to get the money or receipts. No payment has ever been made for any of the property charged in this claim—nor has any payment been made for any property taken from me during the war. I never filed any claim against the government for property taken from me during the war until I filed the petition upon which we are now engaged. The mare was worth at that time $125.00, that is what she was valued at on the receipt which I have testified, corn was worth $1.00 per bushel and was so estimated on the receipt. I expect to get the testimony of Sterling Goin as to the final disposition of the receipts and further all the property to which I have testified was taken by the soldiers of the Federal army under Genl Wilcox, and was taken as I can recollect in Nov. 1863, and further the deponent saith not.
Attest
E.A. Shipley Signed Wilson Goin

Page 11
Testimony of Colbert Day
Quest 1 & 2. My name is Colbert Day, my age is 66 years, my residence is 8 ½ miles west of Tazewell, Tenn. and have resided there about 11 years. I resided during the entire war in Claiborne Co., Tenn. about 6 miles from where I now reside and about 4 miles distant from where claimant resided at that time, My occupation is that of a farmer. I am a son-in-law of claimant Wilson Goin. I am not interested in any way in the prosecution of this claim.
Quest 72. I was not present when any of the property charged in this claim was taken. I know nothing about the taking of claimant’s property of my own knowledge
Quest 73. I know the claimant had a bay mare a fine arrival and understood that she was taken by the Federal Soldiers under Genl Wilcox command in 1863 and at that some corn was taken from him at the same time, by the same parties. I got this information at that time. Early in Nov. 1863 so well as I can now recollect, the claimant handed me 3 receipts which he told me he had got for the property taken from him by the federal soldiers, one was for a bay mare, valued at $125.00, and one was for 13 bushels of corn, valued at $13.00, and one was for 10 bushels of corn, valued at $10.00—these receipts were handed to me by claimant to take to Cumberland Gap to get the money and on, I do not recollect the names of the officers who signed the receipts, it was a Lieut who signed the receipts for the mare and for the 13 bushels of corn, I do not think that the officers rank was given for on the receipt for the 10 bushels. I think that the officer who receipted for the mare and the 13 bushels of corn was from Indiana but I am not positive, the receipts were written with ink. I took three receipts to Cumberland Gap twice, the last time I took them there I showed them to an officer (Col. Gerard, I think) who told me the receipts could not be paid there, but that they would have to go to Knoxville. I took the receipts back and handed them to the claimant stating to him what I had been told at Cumberland Gap, this was the last that I ever saw of the receipts, and further the deponent saith not.
Attest
E.A. Shipley Signed Colbert Day

Page 14
Testimony of William Killian
Quest 1 & 2. My name is William Killian, my age is a 38 years, my residence is 8 miles west of Tazewell, Tenn., and have resided there about 4 years, I was born and raised in Claiborne Co., Tenn., my occupation is that of a farmer. I am a brother-in-law of claimant Wilson Goin.
Quest 72 & 73. I was present at the claimant’s sometime in Nov. 1863 and saw the Federal soldiers of Genl Wilcoxs command take from the claimant’s stable some corn in a wagon. I think that there was about 10 bushels of the corn, the wagon was not quite full, there was one officer with the soldiers—who got the corn, he saw the corn taken—I do not recollect that the claimant was present when the corn was taken, but he might have been. Claimant’s wife complained to the Officer as to the taking of the corn. I do not recollect what the Officer said in reply but they took what corn there was in the stable. I think I heard the Officer say that his name was Carter in reply to a question of a lady named (ink has smeared, cannot read first name) Keck, I did not see any corn taken from the claimant’s field, I did not see the claimant’s mare taken, I helped to put the mare in the pasture the night before she was taken. I saw her that night in the possession of an officer, I think I saw no receipts given for the property. I heard no receipts asked for. I do not know what Regt the Officers belonged to, there was some 8 to 10 soldiers along with the wagon, they got the corn, it was the same officers who got the corn who had the mare. I swapped the mare to the claimant a short time before she was taken, I got her in Kentucky in the fall of 1860. I traded a gray mare for her, claimant’s mare was a good arrival, and I consider that she was worth $140.00 or $150.00, corn was worth $1.00 per bushel at that time, the corn was ripe, it had been pulled but not shucked, and further the deponent saith not.
Attest
E.A. Shipley Signed William (x his mark) Killian

Page 17
Testimony of George W. Freece
Quest 1 & 2. My name is George W. Freece, my age is 30 years, my residence is in—Tazewell, Tenn., and have resided there over 2 years, I have always resided in Claiborne Co., Tenn., my occupation is that of a practicing physician. I am not related to the claimant Wilson Goin, nor am I interested in the success of his claim.

Quest 51 & ---. I am here to testify in favor of Wilson Goin the claimant. I have known the claimant nearly all of my life, and have been intimately acquainted with him during the whole time. I resided within 1 ½ miles of claimant during the war. I met him frequently during the war, perhaps on an average of one time each week—I conversed with claimant often about the war its causes progressive. I do not at this time recollect any special conversation that I had with claimant during the war. I have talked with claimant both privately and publicly during the war, concerning the war, all the conversations which I had with claimant during the war left the impression upon my mind that he was a Union man. I know that claimant was in the habit of leaving his home and hiding in the woods where there was any danger from the rebels, he did not hide from the Union forces. I have heard of him leaving home and hiding in the woods on account of the rebels, I also heard that he once went to Kentucky to escape rebel prosecution.
I do not know nor have I ever heard of the claimant having done anything against the Union cause, I know that the claimant had 2 sons in the Federal army, their names were John G. Goin & Andrew J. Goin, he also had a son-in-law named Jackson Keck in the federal service, I think, they all belonged to Co. C, 1st Tenn., Lt. Arty, claimant was reflected to be a loyal man among his neighbors. John W. Buford, Jerald D. Mayes, Andrew J. Duncan, William K. Recton & others were among the prominent Union men in claimant’s vicinity and could testify to claimant’s loyalty during the war. I was a Union man and the claimant so regarded me, the claimant knew my sentiments from frequent conversations we had. I have a dim recollection of the rebels having taken a gun
from the claimant during the war, but cannot now recollect any of the particulars, I do not recollect that I ever heard any threats made against him during the war by the rebels on account of his known sentiments. From my intimate acquaintance with the claimant, from his conversations, acts and reputation for loyalty among his neighbors, I do not think that claimant could have established his loyalty to the Confederacy at any rate, he could never have satisfied me that he was loyal to the Confederacy, and for that the deponent saith not.
Attest
E.A. Shipley Signed George W. Freece

Page 20
Testimony of Andrew J. Duncan
Quest 1 & 2. My name is Andrew J. Duncan, my age is 51 years, my residence is 5 miles west of Tazewell, Claiborne Co., Tenn., and have resided in this county near 40 years, my occupation is that of a farmer. I am in no way related to the claimant Wilson Goin, nor am I interested in the success of his claim.
Quest 52. I am here to testify in favor of the claimant in his cause.
Quest 53. I have known the claimant about 20 years.
Quest 54. I lived within about 2 miles of the claimant during the war.
Quest 55. From the beginning of the war until the 10th day of Feb’y 1862, when I enlisted as a soldier in Co.” I”, 3rd T___?, I saw him as often as once each week, from the 17th of June to the 17th of Sept., 1862, while I was on duty with my command at Cumberland Gap, I saw him frequently during the period between the 17th of Sept., 1863 and the 14th of Oct., 1863, the date that I was discharged from the service. I saw him some 5 or 6 different times, I being at home on leave from the latter date until the close of the war, I saw him frequently as once each week.
Quest 56. I have conversed with the claimant about the war, its causes, progress & results. I do not suppose we ever met when we did not talk of the war, its causes & that being the general topic of conversation at among known Union men , when they met he always expressed him-self in favor of the Union and in favor of the suppression of the rebellion by the force of arms—I have frequently heard the claimant say that he wanted the Confederacy blotted out these conversation were—held wherever we met, they were had when we were alone and in the presence of others whom we could trust as friends of the Government, we had to be very particular as to whom we trusted.
Quest 57. While I was in the army as before stated the claimant gave me information as to the whereabouts and movements of the rebels so as to unable me to help out of their hands, I always found his information to be correct as far I could learn—and my movements were guided by such information.
Quest 58. I never heard of anything done or said by claimant that was against the Union cause. I do not believe that he could have done or said anything against the Union cause without my knowing it.
Quest 59. I have heard of claimant feeding a great many Union refuges and Federal soldiers. Claimant lived on Powell’s river and I frequently heard at the time of his putting Union refuges across the river as they were making their way toward the Union lives. I do not know that I ever saw him doing this, but I have sent refuges to him to be put across the river and it was a fact well known to Union that he was so doing. In case the rebel authorities had heard he was aiding refuges in their escape he would have been taken off and imprisoned.
Quest 60. The public reputation of claimant was that of a Union man during the war, I never heard a doubt of his loyalty expressed either by Union men or rebels, I have heard rebels curse him as a damned old Lincolnite among the rebels so abusing him were; Daniel Clive, Madison Clive & others. J.M. Buford, George W. Freece, J.D. Mayes, and any other of his Union neighbors could testify to his public reputation as a Union man.
Quest 61. The names mentioned in answer to question No. 60, Baxter Poor, Turner Poor, Manris Tribble, & John Y. Chadwick , were among the prominent Union men of claimant’s vicinity during the war and could all testify to his loyalty.
Quest 62. I was a Union man during the war and the claimant knew me to be such by reason of my service in the Union army.
Quest 63. I have heard him included among other Union men in threats of violence and interrogation by the rebels or account of his loyalty, I have heard of the rebels robbing his house. Quest 64. Claimant’s public reputation as a Union man were his conversations with me and his aiding Union refuges to escape to the federal lives would have prevented him from establishing his loyalty to the Confederacy had it been maintained and further the deponent saith not.
Attest
E.A. Shipley Signed A.J. Duncan

Page 24
Reexamination of witness A.J. Duncan as to facts in answers to interrogatories propounded by claimant’s counsel, witness states as follows: Some time in the month of Nov. 1863, one day quite early in the morning a party of soldiers under command of an officer whom I had met before at Tazewell and whom I knew as Lieut Carter of the 116th or 117th Indiana Infantry Vols. came to my house form the direction of claimant’s house. Lieut Carter told me he was on a foregoing expedition, I asked him where he had been, he said he had been to the house of a man by the name of Goin on the river and had got a load of corn which was down the road in charge of his men. I went with him down to where the corn was there, I saw the mare mentioned in claimant’s petition which I recognized as the property of the claimant. I protested with Lieut Carter against the taking of both claimant’s corn and mare, he said they were compelled to have the corn being without supplies and said that they were compelled to have horses and said that they had as well to take from him as others. The mare was rather a dark bay, 6 or 7 years old, upwards of 15 hands high as was highly well worth at that time $125.00. I asked Lieut Carter if he had paid for the mare and corn that I saw in the wagon which Lieut Carter said he had taken from the claimant, was shucked in the ear and the wagon was some less than half full. Corn was worth at that time $1.00 per bushel, and further the deponent saith not.
Attest
E.A. Shipley Signed A.J. Duncan

Testimony of Sterling Goin
In answer to interrogatories put by claimants counsel the witness states as follows:
My name is Sterling Goin, I reside in Claiborne Co, Tenn., and have resided in said state and county all my life, my age is 54 years, my occupation is that of a farmer. I am a 2nd cousin of claimant Wilson Goin.
Sometime during the late war about the latter part of the year 1863 as near as I can now recollect the claimant Wilson Goin handed to me what was said to be some receipts for property taken him by the federal army with the request that I should take this to Knoxville and get the money on them if I could to the best of m recollection, there were 3 receipts, one for a mare, and the others for corn, but I do not recollect the amount of corn the receipts called for, nor the value of the mare, I took the receipts as requested by Claimant to Knoxville about the date above specified. I took them to an officer at Knoxville where such papers were being received and handed them to a person who appeared to have charge of such business, I do not recollect that anything was said by the person to whom I handed the receipts. I do not know the persons name to whom I handed the receipts, I left the receipts with that person whom I found in the office it was what was called the Burnside Commission. I never saw the receipts afterwards. I received no money on them, I am certain I took some receipts for some other parties at the same time – and left them at the same place. I have now forgetting who the other parties were, I think I should have forgotten the circumstance of taking the receipts of the claimant if he had me asked me about matter so frequently, my recollection about the circumstance is very indistinct at this remote period—I only know that I took receipts to Knoxville as directed and left them there. I took no memorandum nor did I receive any receipt for the papers and if any conversation took place, I have forgotten it, I would suppose as a matter of course something was said between us. I think I went back to Knoxville to look after the papers, but the Commission had broken up and I could learn nothing about them or the receipts I left with them, and further the deponent saith not.
Attest
E.A. Shipley Signed Sterling (x his mark) Goin

No. 20035
Claim of
Wilson Goin
Of
Claiborne County
State of Tennessee
$145.00
Testimony of
William Goin, page 1
Colbert Day, page 11
Wm Killian, page 14
Geo W. Freece, page 17
Andy J. Duncan, page 20
Andy J. Duncan, page 24
Taken by
E.A. Shipley
Special Commissioner
Actual Fees and Costs $9.50
Agents or Attorneys at Washington: (blank)
Sept. 27, 1877

“Last Page”
Note. - On this page the special commissioner may enter any explanation, statement, note or comment of his own which may be of service in the examination and decision of the claim at Washington. If there be anything noticeable in the appearance, conduct, or condition of the witness the fact should be noted on this page. If the special commissioner knows or hears anything, apart from what appears in the deposition, that either confirms or impugns the credibility of the testimony or the merit of the claim, he should state what he knows or what he has heard, with the means of knowledge, or the names of his informants, as the case may be, in order that formal inquiry may be made, or further evidence demanded, if necessary. It would be serviceable to both sides if the special commissioner were to ascertain and set down the names of the men, still living, who, by general reputation, were leading Unionists of the war-period in the vicinity of the claimant. Comment or opinion based merely on the testimony taken is not desired.
================================================
Hon. Commissioners: There no thing that I have been able to see in the department of fo__? the claimant and witnesses to give them any discredit whatsoever. The claimant is quite an old man and very conscientious and was a good Union man, and that he has stated nothing but facts.
Very respectfully,
signed E.A. Shipley

Office of the Commissioners of Claims
Washington, D.C., June 15th, 1875
Memorandum No. 20035
Wilson Goin
Cocke Co., Tenn.
$145.00
Burnside Claims Commission
No. 1234
Wilson Goin
Claiborne Co., Tenn.
Amt. of Claim
Dec/63, Jan/64 $125.00

1 mare, & 23 bu corn

D-3-221
Claim No. 51556
Sett. No. 3687
Wilson Goin
$145.00
Due him
Out Of The Appropriation For
“Claims of Loyal Citizens for supplies furnished
during the Rebellion”
For amount allowed him
By the Commissioners of Claims
Reported, Mch 15, 1879
Returned, Mch 24, 1879
Requisition No. 1680, dated
Apl 2, 1879, transmitted for
Warrant 5 Apl, 1879.

THE UNITED STATES, to Wilson Goin,
The amount allowed him by Act of Congress, Private No. 183 approved March 3, 1877, entitled “An Act making appropriations for the payment of claims reported allowed by the Commissioners of Claims under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1871.”
The sum of: One hundred and forty five ($145.00) dollars.
Payable to claimant in care of B. McKinney, Tazewell, Tenn.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
Second Comptroller’s Office, Third auditor’s Office
March 24, 1879 March 14, 1879
Wm A. Saxton H.M. Bennett
Clerk. Clerk.

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Read the article by Eddie Goins regarding this family line at the following link:

Thomas Going Research - Part I

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1 comment:

  1. the name is George Washington Treece not Freece

    ReplyDelete