Sunday, March 8, 2009

Georgetown District/County, SC Early Records

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgetown,_South_Carolina

Georgetown is the third oldest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina and the county seat of Georgetown County.[3] Located on Winyah Bay at the confluence of the Great Pee Dee River, Waccamaw River, and Sampit River, Georgetown is the second largest seaport in South Carolina, handling over 960,000 tons of materials a year.

History
Georgetown occupies a unique place in American history. In fact, some historians claim that American history began here in 1526 with the earliest settlement in North America by Europeans with African slaves. It is believed that in that year the Spanish, under Lucas Vásquez de Ayllón, founded a colony on Waccamaw Neck called San Miguel de Guadalupe. For multiple reasons, the colony failed including a likely fever epidemic and a revolt of African slaves who went to live with the Cofitachiqui Indians in the area. Having failed as farmers, the surviving Spanish sailed to the Spice Islands of the Caribbean on a ship built from local cypress and oak trees.

After settling Charles Town in 1670, the English established trade with the Indians and the trading posts in the outlying areas quickly became settlements.

By 1721, the petition for a new parish, Prince George, Winyah, on the Black River was granted. In 1734, Prince George, Winyah was divided and the newly created Prince Frederick Parish came to occupy the church at Black River. Prince George Parish, Winyah then encompassed the new town of Georgetown on the Sampit River.

In 1729, Elisha Screven laid the plan for Georgetown and developed the city in a four-by-eight block grid. Referred to as the “Historic District”, the original grid city is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and still bears the original street names, lot numbers, and many of the original homes.

The Indian trade declined soon after Georgetown was established and indigo became the cash crop with rice as a secondary crop.[5] Agricultural profits were so great between 1735-1775 that in 1757 the Winyah Indigo Society, whose members paid dues in indigo, opened and maintained the first public school between Charles Town and Wilmington.

When the American Revolution erupted, Georgetown played a large part by sending both Thomas Lynch, Sr. and Thomas Lynch, Jr. to sign the Declaration of Independence. Later in the war, Marquis de Lafayette arrived in Georgetown from France to help the Colonists in the war against England. During the final years of the conflict, Georgetown was the important port for supplying General Nathanael Greene's army. Francis Marion (the Swamp Fox) led many guerrilla actions in this vicinity.

Following the American Revolution, rice became the staple crop. It required the low land along the rivers for cultivation and thus the rice plantations were established around Georgetown on its five rivers. By 1840, the Georgetown District (later County) produced nearly one-half of the total rice crop of the United States, and became the largest rice-exporting port in the world.
This wealth produced an aristocratic way of life marked by stately plantation manor houses, elegant furniture, generous hospitality and a leisured lifestyle for a select few which lasted until 1860.[6] Many of these plantations are still standing today, including Mansfield Plantation on the banks of the Black River. The profits from Georgetown's rice trade flooded into nearby Charleston, where they stoked a thriving mercantile and factoring economy.

The town's thriving economy long attracted settlers from elsewhere, including a number of planters and shipowners who emigrated to Georgetown from Virginia. These included the Shackelford family, whose representative John Shackelford moved to Georgetown in the eighteenth century after serving in the Virginia forces of the Continental Army. His descendants became prominent planters, lawyers, judges and Georgetown and Charleston businessmen.[7]
Georgetown and Georgetown County suffered terribly during Reconstruction (1865-1876). The rice crops of 1866-88 were failures due to disrupted labor patterns, lack of capital and inclement weather. Rice continued to be grown commercially until about 1910, but never on the scale or with the profits attained before 1860.

After reconstruction ended, Georgetown turned to wood products for its economic survival and by 1900 there were several lumber mills in operation on the Sampit River. The largest was the Atlantic Coast Lumber Company which provided a much needed boost to the local economy.
As the twentieth century dawned, Georgetown, under the leadership of Mayor William Doyle Morgan, modernized. The city added electricity, telephone service, sewer facilities, rail connections, some paved streets and sidewalks, new banks, a thriving port, a new public school and a handsome Post Office and Customs House building.

Like most cities, Georgetown suffered great economic deprivation during the Great Depression. The Atlantic Coast Lumber Company went bankrupt early in the depression, putting almost everyone out of work. In 1936 help arrived. In that year the Southern Kraft Division of International Paper opened a mill which by 1944 was the largest in the world.

In recent years, the economy has become more diversified. A steel mill has located here, tourism has become a booming business and many retirees have chosen to settle here in this area of lovely beaches, plantations developed as communities, and pleasant climate.

Georgetown has featured the visitation of many prominent people throughout the nearly 277 years of cities existence. George Washington visited Clifton Plantation and addressed the townspeople in 1791. President James Monroe was entertained in 1821 at Prospect Hill (now Arcadia) on Waccamaw with a real red carpet rolled out to the river. Theodosia Burr made her home at the Oaks Plantation (now part of Brookgreen Gardens) after her marriage to Joseph Alston in 1801 and departed from Georgetown on her ill-fated voyage in 1812. Brookgreen was also the boyhood home of one of America's most famous painters, Washington Allston. Joel R. Poinsett lived at White House Plantation on the Black River. After retiring from government service, Poinsett entertained President Martin Van Buren at his home. President Grover Cleveland, as guest of the Annandale Gun Club, came for duck hunting and was feted by the citizens in 1894 and 1896. Bernard Baruch, America's elder statesman, entertained many notables at Hobcaw Barony, his home for many years. Among those were President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, General Mark Clark and General Omar Bradley.

Today, the Historic District of Georgetown contains more than fifty homes, public buildings and sites which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=179889

Series: S213190
Volume: 0006
Page: 00046
Item: 000
Date: 10/17/1784
Description: GOWING, JOHN, PLAT FOR 200 ACRES ON DROWNING CREEK, GEORGE TOWN DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOHN HENDERSON.
Names indexed: GOWING, JOHN; HENDERSON, JOHN
Locations: DROWNING CREEK; GEORGETOWN DISTRICT
Document type: PLAT

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Records submitted by Joanne Pezzullo. Joanne has lost some records over the years and is not sure exactly of the sources. Several websites contain the some of the same records.

William Middleton Sr. left a sizeable estate (worth about 4,000pounds not counting land), inventoried and appraised by WilliamMiddleton, Jr., Gideon Gibson, Sr., and Gideon Gibson, Jr. on April 24,1773. An interesting list of debtors to the estate includes:
Wm Alston due the Estate for Pork......55"--"-
Gideon Gibson Sr Note to the Estate...157"--"-<-----------------------------
George Gibson due to the Estate........26"--"-<-----------------------------
John Berry by Acct due the Estate.......5"--"-
Jordan Gibson Sr. Acct.................17"--"- <----------------------------
Benj. Blackmans acct.......96/3
Peter Keighleys acct.......25/
Isaac Nevils acct..........L 5
Thomas Brewintons acct.....60/
Frederick Jones acct...... L 10
Jacob Goings acct dues said Estate......7"10"- <----------------------------**********************************************

1785. Will of Moses Bass of Prince Georges Parish, George Town Dist, Province of SC, being indisposed in Body.... to MOURNING GOING, dau of JACOB GOING, one cow marked with a cross & over bit & undr bit in one ear and cross & whole under nick in the other ear; to SARAH GOING, dau of JACOB GOING, one cow marked in the above mentioned mark; to ELIZABETH GOING, dau of JACOB GOING, one cow marked with a cross & undr bit & over bit in each ear and branded ME; to ANNE GOING, dau of JACOB GOING, one heifer marked with a cross and under bit & over bit in each ear branded ME; to CYNTHA GOING, dau of JACOB GOING, one heifer yearling marked with a cross & over bit & under bit in each ear & branded ME; to my beloved cousin Jeremiah Bass, tract of 100 ac granted to John Smith, and one negro named Peter, one negro woman named Fann, one negro boy named Jack with their increase; my wife Elizabeth Bass to have the use of said plantation & tract of land granted to John Smith her lifetime and the use of negroes Peter, Fann & Jack & their increase her life time; to my beloved cousin Wright Bass, the plantation, mill, & tract of land containing 444 ac that I now live on, one negro woman Jane, my wife Elizabeth Bass to have the use of the plantation, mill & tract of land and negro woman her lifetime; to Henry Harison, son of James Harison, one negro woman Cate & increase, my wife to have the use of the negro woman her lifetime; to JOSEPH GOING, JUNR, one negro girl named Judah & increase, my wife to have the use her life time; to my beloved wife Elizabeth Bass, one negro man named Jack, one woman named Florah, one woman named Nan, one boy named Isum, one boy named Roger, and my cattle, about 110 head, branded ME, all my stock of horses & mares, all my household furniture & plantation tools, 26 head of sheep, and my hogs, also negro girl Violet; to JACOB GOING, a plantation of 50 ac granted to John Crawford; I appoint my wife Elizabeth Bass and my friend Luke Whitefield and James Harison, executors, dated 28 Feb 1777. Moses Bass (M) (LS), Wit: Malachi Murfee, Jeremiah Bass (x), Right Bass. A true copy taken from the original and examined by Hugh Horry, Ordinary G Town Dist. Whereas I, the within named Right Bass, am the eldest son of Edward Bass deceased, who was eldest brother of the within named Testator Moses Bass, which said Moses Bass departed this life without issue, whereby I, said Right Bass became his heir at law, and I am willing that all the several devises & bequests in the said will should have full effect, for the memory of my deceased uncle Moses Bass and for the several devisees in the within will, and five shillings, I confirm all the devises, legacies and bequests, 9 Nov 1785. Right Bass (LS), Wit: Chas Cotesworth Pinckney, Wm Smith. Proved in Charleston Dist by the oath of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney 28 Jun 1786 before Dl. Mazyck, JP. Rec 28 Jun 1786. S-5, 283-284. (Holcomb, SC Deed Abstracts, 1783-1788, Bks I-5 thru Z-5, 1996. SML 975.7 Hol)

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http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=178931

Series: S213190
Volume: 0003
Page: 00356
Item: 001
Date: 2/15/1786
Description: GOWIN, JOHN, PLAT FOR 100 ACRES ON DROWNING CREEK, GEORGE TOWN DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOHN HENDERSON.
Names indexed: GOWIN, JOHN; HENDERSON, JOHN
Locations: DROWNING CREEK; GEORGETOWN DISTRICT
Document type: Plat

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http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=185610

Series: S213190
Volume: 0014
Page: 00143
Item: 000
Date: 3/2/1786
Description: ROTHMAHLER, JOB, PLAT FOR 1,200 ACRES ON DROWNING CREEK, GEORGE TOWN DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOHN HENDERSON.
Names indexed: GOWING, JOHN; HENDERSON, JOHN; ROTHMAHLER, JOB
Locations: DROWNING CREEK; GEORGETOWN DISTRICT; NORTH CAROLINA
Document type: PLAT

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http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=192523

Series: S213190
Volume: 0026
Page: 00032
Item: 000
Date: 11/12/1789
Description: GIBSON, STEPHEN, PLAT FOR 1,700 ACRES ON LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER, GEORGETOWN DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY WILLIAM STEWART.
Names indexed: BLUE, WILLIAM; GIBSON, STEPHEN; GOWIN, LUCY; STEWART, WILLIAM
Locations: GEORGETOWN DISTRICT; LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER
Document type: PLAT

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http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=193039

Series: S213190
Volume: 0026
Page: 00322
Item: 001
Date: 12/30/1791
Description: BLUE, WILLIAM, PLAT FOR 250 ACRES ON JUMPING GULLY, GEORGETOWN DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOHN HENDERSON ON DECEMBER 22, 1785.
Names indexed: BLUE, WILLIAM; GOINS, THOMAS; HENDERSON, JOHN; MCKAY, JOHN
Locations: GEORGETOWN DISTRICT; JUMPING GULLY BRANCH; LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER
Document type: PLAT

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http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=193095

Series: S213190
Volume: 0026
Page: 00349
Item: 002
Date: 7/26/1792
Description: CAMPBELL, DANIEL, PLAT FOR 100 ACRES ON HAYS SWAMP, GEORGE TOWN DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY WILLIAM STEWART FOR JOHN MCDONALD.
Names indexed: CAMPBELL, DANIEL; GOWEN, THOMAS; MCDONALD, JOHN; STEWART, WILLIAM
Locations: GEORGETOWN DISTRICT; HAYES SWAMP; LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER
Document type: PLAT

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http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=195914

Series: S213190
Volume: 0030
Page: 00006
Item: 002Date: 7/26/1792
Description: CAMPBELL, DANIEL, PLAT FOR 500 ACRES ON NORTH EAST SIDE OF LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER, GEORGE TOWN DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY WILLIAM STEWART FOR JOHN MCDONALD.
Names indexed: CAMPBELL, DANIEL; FOLLIE; GIBSON, STEPHEN; GOWEN, THOMAS; MCDONALD, JOHN; STEWART, WILLIAM
Locations: GEORGETOWN DISTRICT; LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER
Document type: PLAT

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http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=196115

Series: S213190
Volume: 0030
Page: 00112
Item: 002Date: 4/26/1793
Description: FATHEREE, WILLIAM, PLAT FOR 800 ACRES ON DROWNING CREEK, GEORGE TOWN DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOHN RUSS.
Names indexed: BARFIELD, JOSHUA; COMBS, JOHN ABIRAM; FATHEREE, WILLIAM; GOWAN, JOHN; RUSS, JOHN
Locations: DROWNING CREEK; GEORGETOWN DISTRICT
Document type: PLAT

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http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=202084

Series: S213190
Volume: 0034
Page: 00353
Item: 001
Date: 4/7/1796
Description: MCKELLER, PETER, PLAT FOR 100 ACRES ON HAYSES SWAMP, GEORGE TOWN DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOSIAH LEWIS.
Names indexed: GIBSON, STEPHEN; GOWING, JOHN; LEWIS, JOSIAH; MCDONALD, JOHN; MCKELLER, PETER
Locations: GEORGETOWN DISTRICT; HAYES SWAMP; LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER
Document type: PLAT

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http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=202480

Series: S213190
Volume: 0035
Page: 00107
Item: 002
Date: 1/4/1798
Description: WATSON, WILLIAM, PLAT FOR 61 ACRES ON LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER AND DROWNING CREEK, GEORGE TOWN DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY D. ROWLAND.
Names indexed: ADAMS, EZEKIEL; GOWEN, JOHN; PAGE, JESSE; ROWLAND, D.; WATSON, WILLIAM
Locations: BEAR SWAMP; CYPRESS BRANCH; DROWNING CREEK; GEORGETOWN DISTRICT; LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER
Document type: PLAT

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1790 Prince Fredericks, Georgetown, SC Federal Census
Bathiah Going
Shadrach Ginn

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1790 Prince Georges, Georgetown, SC Federal Census
Lucey Gowen
John Gowen
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